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Resources

Library of Congress American Memory Collection
Provides access to numerous primary sources including written documents, photographs, prints, maps, spoken words, and moving images.  Also includes links for teachers with lesson plan ideas and historical context information.
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html

National Archives
Especially useful for research with primary sources.  Includes links to “Our Documents,” 100 milestone documents in American History, “Teaching with Documents” which includes primary source analysis worksheets, and the “Charters of Freedom” exhibit.
http://www.archives.gov/

American Experience Online
The companion website to television's longest-running, most-watched history series.  To date, American Experience Online has produced over 100 feature sites. These sites encourage in-depth exploration of the issues surrounding each documentary subject beyond the television screen. American Experience Online has been recognized by a number of online and print publications including Yahoo, USA Today Online, Broadcasting and Cable, The Washington Times, and TV Guide.
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/index.html

U.S.History.org
Created and hosted by the Independence Hall Association in Philadelphia.  Ushistory.org supports the association’s mission to educate the public about the Revolutionary and Colonial eras of American history, as well as Philadelphia.
http://www.ushistory.org/

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Founded in 1994, the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History promotes the study and love of American history.  The Institute maintains its website to serve as a portal for American history on the Web; to offer high-quality educational material for teachers, students, historians, and the public.
http://www.gilderlehrman.org/

Internet Modern History Sourcebook
Provides an extensive collection of public domain and copy-permitted historical texts presented cleanly (without advertising or excessive layout) for educational use.  The Internet Modern History Sourcebook is one of series of history primary sourcebooks (see top of page for links). It is intended to serve the needs of teachers and students in courses in modern European history and American history, as well as in modern Western Civilization and World Cultures. Organized regionally and topically, the Internet Modern History Sourcebook contains a wealth of primary sources. 
http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/modsbook.html

Talking History
An archive of thirty-minute weekly radio programs produced by the Organization of American Historians.  Includes interviews with nationally recognized historians and writers, such as James Loewen, Stephen Ambrose, and William Leuchtenburg.  Contains a variety of secondary source interviews on a many topics in American history.
http://talkinghistory.oah.org/

History Matters
History Matters: The U.S. Survey Course on the Web was first developed in 1998 by the American Social History Project/Center for Media & Learning, City University of New York, and the Center for History and New Media, George Mason University, with initial funding from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation. Over the past several years, it has become a highly regarded gateway to web resources as well as a repository of unique teaching materials, first-person primary documents, and guides to analyzing historical evidence for high school and college students and teachers of American history. In January 2005, the American Historical Association awarded History Matters the James Harvey Robinson Prize for the site’s “outstanding contribution to the teaching and learning of history.”  
http://www.historymatters.gmu.edu/

Eyewitness to History.com
Your ringside seat to history - from the Ancient World to the present. History through the eyes of those who lived it.  Contains numerous primary sources organized chronologically.  Provides historical context information for every primary document.
http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/

Historical Thinking Benchmarks
As part of the webpage of the American Historical Association, the benchmarks for sound professional development for teachers of American history are listed and explained.  The site includes collaboration benchmarks, historical thinking benchmarks and assessment benchmarks.
http://www.historians.org/teaching/policy/benchmarks.htm

Massachusetts History and Social Science Curriculum Framework
Massachusetts History and Social Science Curriculum Framework that was approved by the Board of Education in August 2003.
http://www.doe.mass.edu/frameworks/hss/final.pdf

Edsitement:  The Best of the Humanities on the Web
From the National Endowment for the Humanities in partnership with the National Trust for the Humanities, and the Verizon Foundation. This educational partnership brings online humanities resources from some of the world's great museums, libraries, cultural institutions, and universities directly to your classroom.
http://edsitement.neh.gov/

American Rhetoric
This website is dedicated to rhetoric and public communication in the United States.  It offers an archive of speeches and movie clips of speeches.  Organized into an online speech bank, the top 100 speeches, and speech of the week, American Rhetoric provides easy access to numerous primary sources for use in the classroom.
www.americanrhetoric.com

Jamestown Journey
Jamestown Journey is the official education curriculum website of “America’s 400th Anniversary.”  Sign up to receive free access to numerous lesson plans for all grade levels which stress the importance of Jamestown where the seeds of our elective representative form of government were planted, the concept of religious freedom began to evolve, the wellspring of America’s current cultural diversity formed, and the spirit of exploration flourished.
www.jamestownjourney.org

Jamestown Online Adventure
This website provides a virtual adventure where students make decisions regarding settlement and livelihood for an English colony.  Students are guided to make decisions with the help of Native Americans and other colonists; they may also refer to the London Company’s instructions.   At the end of the adventure, students compare their colony to the historical Jamestown.  With a “Now we know” section, students learn the history of the Jamestown experience.   This website provides an excellent “hook” for beginning a study of Jamestown or the American colonies.
http://www.jamestown2007.org/kids-jamestown-adventure.cfm/

 

 

   
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